#CitScientistWeek: Citizen Scientists are the Key to Finding an Alzheimer's Cure

Alzheimer’s is one of our country’s most urgent public health crises. There are currently 5.4 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s, that number expected to rise to 14 million by 2025. That’s why participation in Alzheimer’s studies is so important. In fact, the first person to be cured of Alzheimer’s will be a clinical trial participant. We are proud to be one of more than 70 Alzheimer’s clinical trials research centers nationwide in the Global Alzheimer’s Platform Foundation’s (GAP) network.

This week we are honoring our Alzheimer’s clinical trial participants Richard Apple, Jim Butler, and Ida Manning as part of GAP’s National Citizen Scientist Week. Each of these participants has been nominated for GAP’s Citizen Scientist Awards in recognition of the crucial role that they play in our work to end Alzheimer’s. Thanks to their participation in and support of our research, we maintain hope that every day brings us closer to finding an effective treatment or cure for Alzheimer’s.

While our nominees’ commitment to research is extraordinary, they themselves are mostly ordinary people focused on what they can do to help others. Even if you’re healthy, you may be able to participate in Alzheimer’s research.

We are currently enrolling participants in Alzheimer’s studies. We love our Citizen Scientists, but they need your help. Did you know that 90% of Alzheimer’s clinical trials nationwide experience delays due to recruitment difficulties?

SEE A LIST OF OUR RESEARCH STUDIES HERE

People like Richard, Jim, and Ida are doing their part to ensure no one has to be an Alzheimer’s statistic anymore. Alzheimer’s is a complex puzzle, but research participants are the most important piece of the solution. We hope you will consider following their example by joining a clinical trial.


“It gives me a sense of purpose and power over the disease to know that I’m participating in what could lead to the cure that’s going to really help so many people.”
— Richard Apple, Citizen Scientist