Connect with Family and Friends

Many studies have shown that across the lifespan, increased social activity is linked to a lower rate of cognitive decline. People who have more social contacts score higher on tests of memory and executive function (the cognitive processes that help you plan, organize, and complete tasks).

Source: Very Well Mind

Source: Very Well Mind

Good Friends Might Be Your Best Brain Booster As You Age

Ask Edith Smith, a proud 103-year-old, about her friends, and she’ll give you an earful.

There’s Johnetta, 101, whom she’s known for 70 years and who has Alzheimer’s disease. “I call her every day and just say ‘Hi, how are you doing?’ She never knows, but she says hi back, and I tease her,” Smith said.

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Source: National Institute on Aging

Source: National Institute on Aging

Research Suggests a Positive Correlation between Social Interaction and Health

Several research studies have shown a strong correlation between social interaction and health and well-being among older adults and have suggested that social isolation may have significant adverse effects for older adults.

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Source: How Stuff Works

Source: How Stuff Works

Top 5 Ways for the Aging to Remain Socially Engaged

No matter how old you are, engaging socially with other people is important. Through socialization, we adjust our perceptions, increase our knowledge, acquire new skills -- and just have fun. Interpersonal relationships are often the most important part of a person's life, and the mental stimulation they provide never gets old, even if you do

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